Artists


  • Marilyn Banner

    Marilyn Banner creates paintings in encaustic, a mixture of beeswax, pigment, and resin. Her current work focuses on landscape and her own personal vision of the natural world. Influenced by the early 20th century masters Ryder, Dove, O’Keefe, and Burchfield, and by the expressive brushwork of painters such as Soutine and Guston, she has developed an individual style more concerned with the abstract qualities of line, shape, color, and texture than with traditional representation. Inspired by the philosophy of abstract expressionism, i.e., the importance of the “inner,” and increasingly grounded in the natural world, her work combines a joyful spontaneity, reflection, and a deep responsiveness to nature.

    Find more information at http://www.marilynbanner.com

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  • Diana Bunting

    Diana Bunting is a contemporary plein air painter. She is interested in freely interpreting changing weather conditions and light. The sweep and grandeur of the Shenandoah Valley and the rocky coast of Rhode Island are her most frequent subjects.

    An admirer of the Canadian painter Thom Thomson, Bunting uses short periods of time to try to simplify and capture the moment in a painting. “There is so much to choose from nature. I have always been drawn to the landscape as a way of connecting to and discovering nature. I usually start with something that attracts me and try to remain open to the enormous possibilities and changes that occur from moment to moment.” The abstract relationships between shapes and colors and composition are fundamental to her painting. “I do not hesitate to try several approaches to a particular subject, to wipe out and scrape off a canvas and start again. The unexpected is often most successful.”Diana Bunting lives in The Plains, Virginia.

    Born and raised in South America, she was educated at Hollins University, the Sorbonne, and the Ecole du Louvre. Her works hang in private collections in the United States, Peru, Argentina, Canada and Uruguay.

    Find more information at http://www.dianabunting.com

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  • Teresa Duke

    Teresa Ann Duke was born in Washington, D.C. in 1962. The daughter of two physicians, she spent much of her childhood developing her passion for art while painting alongside her mother. In 1987, the artist moved to Warrenton, Virginia while pursuing her Master of Fine Arts degree at George Washington University under the tutelage of William Woodward. While there, she received the Robert N. Alfandre award for drawing. Afterwards, she spent several years in scenic Rappahannock County, Virginia developing a love of plein airpainting. Ms. Duke spent two years living in northern New Mexico interpreting the brilliant light and saturated colors of the high desert. She studied with Wolf Kahn during this time at the Santa Fe Institute of Fine Arts. Ms. Duke had the privilege of working with noted portrait master Daniel Greene during the summer of 2009.Currently the artist lives and works in Fauquier County, Virginia and teaches art to young people at Wakefield School in The Plains, Virginia. Her recent work continues to focus on the local landscape, still life, and equine subjects.

    Recently her painting, Paddock at Keeneland was chosen for the 75th anniversary issue of Keeneland Magazine in the fall of 2011. She was a featured artist in The Piedmont Virginian, Winter 2012. She was a juried artist at the 2011 Painting Annapolis plein air event, and received an Honorable Mention for her painting View Down Prince George Street. Youngblood Art Studio in The Plains, Virginia featured Ms. Duke’s recent work at their December 2011 show.

    Find more information at http://www.teresaannduke.com

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  • Carlos Edwards

    In his abstract work, Carlos Edwards produces a conception of the world as a reality made up of dualities and oppositions. The use of stones found in rivers, eroded by time and water, contrasts with the rigid and solid materiality of the stone. The artist works the stone and transforms it into a fragile piece, where elements such as water and wind are part of the work. His sense of space is defined by the various intersecting planes in the formal composition of the sculpture, which is built by the organic history of the stone and the intervention of the artist. Carlos Edwards’ sculptures are dynamic, powerful and constructive where the geometric rigor is overcome by the empty spaces that are also part of the construction of the sculptures. These spaces of silence are “the presence of the formal absence” in the words of the artist.The sculptor’s work explores the concepts of time, space, matter and spirit.

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  • Michael Heufelder

    Lilla met Michael while he was giving a “show and tell” to the kids at A Place to Be. When Lilla saw what he was doing, she was very moved. Michael is a veteran who served in the front lines in Iraq and Afghanistan. Since his return from an extended service, where he went above and beyond his original call to duty, Michael has used the arts for self-induced therapeutic purposes. Art therapy is a particular interest of Youngblood’s, so we are happy to embrace someone who so beautifully lives the benefits of self-healing through the arts. Michael now captures peace with his iPhone, implementing similar strategies of focus and timing that he needed in his life as a warrior. He also spends hours burning detailed wood carvings of animals to give himself a reason to focus for long, intense periods of time. His astute training in observation shines in his artistic endeavors. He has found a new way to use the skills he developed as a soldier and beautifully he captures peaceful moments, transforming them into images he can share with his viewers.

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  • Helen Hilliard

    Helen Hilliard paints with oil on board. She enjoys the challenge of creating a painting that will make the viewer want to enter in to the scene and stay awhile. Painting is a constant challenge and a lifelong pursuit.Helen Hilliard lives in Free Union, Virginia. She studied at the Schuler School of Fine Art in Baltimore, The Corcoran School of Art and The University of Virginia. She has done workshops with Kevin McPherson, Gavin Brooks and Maggie Siner.

    Find more information at http://www.helenhilliard.com

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  • Tia Maggio

    A native New Yorker, Tia Maggio, was formally trained in graphic design and advertising at Pratt Institute, she went on to the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, to study fine art and art history. Even before then, this pastel artist was immersed in the world of art. Her mother, Patricia, attended the Rhode Island School of design and was a painter and her father, Joseph, “a weekend watercolorist” had his own interior design firm in New York and London. After college, Tia was the director of sales at her father’s firm, during that time she opened and managed their corporate office in London. Later she partnered with her friend Sonja, another Pratt graduate, to form Sontina Graphic Design, where their mainstay was designing company logos. When children came along, Tia left the corporate world and turned to watercolors and from there to pastels. After advertising she enjoyed the looseness –freedom- of fine art. She admires German Expressionist Emil Nolde, and artist Wolf Kahn. She loves the untamed wildness of Nolde and in turn the ethereal calm of Wolf Kahn. Inspired, too, by painter Charles Burchfield, she is excited by his fearless vision. Tia pulls her inspiration from nature as “it is the only thing that really makes sense to me – wild sunsets, storms, brambles and branches.” Once described as a tonalist, she describes herself as a nature based expressionist. Her website is tiamaggio.com.

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  • Charles T. Matheson
    Charles developed his painting skills as a practicing architect, delineating many designs using watercolor. He focuses on landscape painting with many sketches in the outdoors particularly following his lifelong pursuit of fox hunting and driving horses. His book, Hunting Sketches on the Run, has been happily received in the sporting community. He has been a visiting scholar for the University of Virginia School of Architecture, Venice Program, teaching analytical drawing and watercolor studies. His paintings are representative of his visual journey through the many venues of his sport and travels. Usually manipulating watercolor washes, Matheson occasionally turns to oil and abstract interpretations inspired by written narratives. Charles Matheson works from his studio and home in Markham, Virginia.
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  • Nol Putnam

    “So why chose to pound iron? Why choose to stand in front of a 2000 degree fire in July? Why choose to make my hands black, my clothes dirty? And why, in God’s name, would anyone choose a profession where you get burned every day?I think these choices are often personal, but I think too, that they are rooted in our deep ancestral paths having to do with iron in our blood and iron in the fabric of the earth. For me it is all of that and more. My great, great grandfather was a blacksmith and carriage maker; my great grandfather was an engineer in the Navy and always tinkering with parts that had to be newly worked to keep the ships sailing; my grandfather likewise was an engineer and well knew his way around metal. And now in my generation, both my sister and I have been drawn to the manipulation of metal. So for me, ironwork is in my blood and also in my genes. And all the time I thought I had a choice!Using the four sacred elements of earth (iron), fire, air and water daily, I am not sure how much closer I could get to the essence of life. I walk from my house with my faithful Tye, around the pond, past the salt lick for deer, over the first of two small bridges, past the daffodils in the spring, past the old wall that reproachesme daily for not making it whole again, and up to the forge. On a good day I throw open the doors and let the sunshine flood the space.Still, today, after 35 years of forging, I still get the excitement of a new piece … of imagining it, of designing it, of creating it. Every day I get to work as an artist, an engineer, a coal carrier, an accountant, a teacher. Every day I get to work variously with my head, my heart and my hands. What’s not to love? The work continues to give me life.”-Nol Putnam

    Find more information at http://www.caulfieldgallery.com

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  • Gomer Pyles

    Gomer Pyles Gomer not only approaches life with gentleness and imagination, he also has a lovely sense of humor. Part of healing is having a sense of humor. I hope you will all enjoy the intelligent paradoxes in many of Gomer’s titles, which often shed an understanding and incite along side his wonderful photographs and wood drift sculpture. Gomer walks his own path. So much so that he walked here from California a long time ago with his baby {Jamie} you may have heard her play music and his walking stick, which has its own story. Gomer is a keen observers of nature and his surroundings.

    Find more information at Gomer Pyles Illusions

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  • Jennifer Sims

    As a child, Jennifer Sims copied every illustration of people and sea creatures from Homer’s Odyssey, designed intricate, imaginary houses, drew animals and sketched people when they weren’t looking. Particularly entranced by animals, she copied paintings of horses by the masters, creatures from Aesop’s fables, and her own beloved cats.She majored in political science at Oberlin College and went on to get her doctorate. As her career took her into the world of intelligence and national security policy, Jennifer’s life expanded to include husband and kids. Her love for the quiet, unobtrusive practice of art, however, continued.Jennifer has studied with Lynne Donovan, Lilla Ohrstrom, taken sculpture from Goksin Carey, and a workshop with Laura Hazard Clark. She took classes in Connecticut from artists such as Jack Montmeat and Hollis Dunlap.She is also writing a book titles Intelligence in International Politics from the Spanish Armada to Edward Snowden.

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  • Hilde Vogel-Michalik
    Hilde Vogel-Michalik was born in Germany, where she studied English, German, and Art History at both Heidelberg and Berlin Universities, and art at the Folkwang School in Essen, where she studied painting under Professor Joseph Urbach and worked with fellow artist Anton Felderhoff. In 1955, Hilde moved to the U.S. with her husband, sculptor and master carver Harold C. Vogel. The structure of Hilde’s life involved painting, reading, making bread, walking with her dog, and traveling with her sister Friedel Michalik. Hilde’s paintings reflected where they had been – in colors, in medium, in light or dark, and in forms, but not in shapes that we could necessarily recognize as being Egypt or Easter Island, the Grand Canyon, Greece, or Guatemala. Hilde painted for herself, and her paintings are abstract and rarely titled: they might best be seen as her conversations with the world around her, its places, light, colors, and forms. She worked in watercolor, oil, acrylic, or encaustic, a mixture of hot wax and pigment, which was perhaps her favorite medium, with its brilliant opaque colors. Hilde played with colors and with forms. There is order, structure, and strength in her paintings, and also mystery. You will see a hint of the reds of Chaco Canyon, of the stone paving of a village in southern France, of brilliant Greek sunlight, or a moonlit landscape. Some of the pictures are intricate and linear. Others have strange black armatures surrounded by depths of gray and gold. And others look like exploding suns with big shapes and powerful colors. Hilde’s works were a bequest to George Mason University from Harold C. Vogel.
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  • Charlie Westbrook

    “I began painting to escape the trying times imposed on my family during my wife’s fight against cancer. I chose bovines as my subject as I was attracted to their odd, carnal and inevitable meat state. The unusual and bulky physical form of cows and bulls allowed me to explore the parallels between them and my wife’s diseased and chemo ravaged body. After my wife’s passing, my artistic focus shifted to a very personal visual re-interpretation of our family’s portraits now steeped in loss. Today, my artistic focus centers on discovering states of the human experience that can be realized on the canvas through the richness of oil paint and the use of bold composition, color and form.”

    -Charlie Westbrook

    Find more information at charliewestbrook.com

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Bill Cousins

Suzita

Find many of our Artists featured in the Scout Guide!


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